Category Archives: What in the World?

#BringBackOurGirls Day 365 – A March and A Song

Today marks one year since more than 200 girls were abducted by Nigerian militant Islamist group Boko Haram.

TODAY APRIL 14th Join the Global School Girl March, one year since 270+ Nigerian school girls were kidnapped via https://www.facebook.com/bringbackourgirls

News via BBC Africa reports –

 The abduction of the girls in Chibok in north-eastern Nigeria sparked global outrage, with nations such as the US and China promising to help find them.
There have been sightings of the girls reported, but none have been found.Boko Haram say the girls have converted to Islam and been married off. One witness told the BBC that she saw more than 50 of them alive three weeks ago in the north-eastern town of Gwoza.A procession is being held in Nigeria’s capital, Abuja, with 219 girls taking part to represent each missing girl. Nigeria’s incoming president, Muhammadu Buhari, said his government would “do everything in its power to bring them home” but said he “cannot promise that we can find them”.

The #BringBackOurGirls kidnap inspired a song that I wrote titled ‘Aeroplane’ from my upcoming album, ‘Organically Singing’.  It’s a nostalgic, ambient,  emotional song where I incorporated a yoruba children’s folklore song in the chorus, usually sang when kids see an aeroplance fly by. For every airplane those girls might sight in the sky, I can only imagine how they will have hopes and thoughts of a rescue mission. The lyrics of the second verse  is about the Chibok girls that have not been brought back. This is music to pull your heartstrings and hopefully move us all to action.

AEROPLANE LYRICS
Verse 1
There’s a little boy
With hopes and dreams
To one day be a man
Always wondered what the future really holds
Crying on the streets
Daddy’s gone, mama’s working so hard
He looks up to the sky and sings a melody

Chorus
Aeroplane o dabo (Goodbye Aeroplane)
Ba mi k’iya mi eleko (Say hi to my mom who sells wrapped corn meals)
Eko meji oyomi (Two corn meals will be enough for me)
Oyomi o Oyomi (Enough for me, enough for me)
E gbam gbam E jigi jigi (A vocal simulation of the sound an aeroplane makes when taking off)

Verse 2
There’s a little girl
She goes to school
Learning for tomorrow
Evil comes and takes her far away
Night and Day, she’s wailing
Waiting for her rescue
She looks up to the sky
And sings a melody

Chorus
Aeroplane o dabo
Ba mi k’iya mi eleko
Eko meji oyomi
Oyomi o Oyomi
E gbam gbam
E jigi jigi

Bridge
Aeeeeeeroplane
Flying So High
I wish I can touch the sky 2X

Chorus
(c) Written, Performed and Arranged by Tosinger

Beautifully Dreaming.. Positively Doing

Tosinger

Mutua Matheka (@truthslinger) | Photographer |#ForGarissa | #147NotjustAnumber | #Kenya

Very sad news from the continent as Garissa, capital of Garissa County, Kenya, East Africa came under attack.  On Thursday, April 2, a deadly Islamist militant group; al-Shabab massacres Christian students while praying at Garissa University College,  killing nearly 150 students, most of them at the prime of their youth,  aged between 19 and 23 at the university in the country’s east. A social media campaign reflects the outrage and grief of the people of Kenya and Africa at large.  We continue to pray for comfort of the families affected. Terrorism has to stop!!!

 

Mutua Matheka – Kenyan Photographer

Mutua Matheka, a Kenyan Photographer, documents the vigil/ three-day period of national mourning under the hashtags  | #ForGarissa | #147NotjustAnumber |. Families, friends, journalists and others also attempt to humanize and honor those lost, rather than have them reduced to a mere statistic.

Here are some of the touching images he captured –

| #ForGarissa | #147NotjustAnumber |

| #ForGarissa | #147NotjustAnumber |

Embedded image permalink

| #ForGarissa | #147NotjustAnumber |

Embedded image permalink

| Follow the Light |

Embedded image permalink

| Do not be dismayed, neither should you be afraid |

Embedded image permalink

Kenyans attend a candle lit vigil late Tuesday at Uhuru park in capital Nairobi in memory of the people killed in last week’s deadly attack on Kenya’s Garissa University College, on April 7, 2015. Via Time.com

Kenyans attend a candle lit vigil late Tuesday at Uhuru park in capital Nairobi in memory of the people killed in last week's deadly attack on northern Kenya's Garissa University College, on April 7, 2015.
Kenyans attend a candle lit vigil late Tuesday at Uhuru park in capital Nairobi in memory of the people killed in last week’s deadly attack on Kenya’s Garissa University College, on April 7, 2015. Via Time.com

 

May the souls of the departed rest in peace and the wicked desist from their ways.

 

On African Artists and ‪#BET‬ Awards

On ‪#‎BET‬ Awards Treatment of Their African/International Winners

Here is an article that I will like to share written by Sam Mobit (DJ Chick). It makes sense and I hope it serves as food for thought.

“The BET awards were established in 2001 by the Black Entertainment Television (BET) to celebrate African Americans and other minorities in music, acting, sports, as well as other fields of entertainment. The awards are presented annually and are broadcast live. The BET awards has several components: preliminary awards, the main ceremony, and the post award show. The preliminary portion of the show is not televised and does not take place on the main stage such as the awards given during the main ceremony. Among the preliminary awards is the “Best International Act” award. This award is given to the international artist who has demonstrated outstanding achievements through their music. Although this element of the BET awards is fairly new, it does not receive any coverage or publicity to confirm its existence. I can assure you that a majority of the viewers (American or non-American) are unaware of the international Segment. As a result, I ask myself why do these African artists keep coming back to get disrespected year after year? These artists must travel from their respective countries in Africa and come out of pocket for their accommodations in order to receive an award from a public who doesn’t even know they exist or care about their music. It seems as though the artists in this ” Best International Act” segment are just pawns to fulfill a diversity clause or serve as BET’s attempt at buffering their empire through the use of weak international promotion.

I think it is great that BET is recognizing these African artists and their work, but my main issue is the way that they are treated. It is as if the African artists are treated as second class. They do not receive their awards on prime time television like the American artists, and their segment of the award show is either pre-recorded or held in a separate backroom location. How rude is it to invite someone to an event but only allow them to be present for the preliminary events but not the main ceremony. Artists like Davido, Ice Prince, Fally Ipupa, Sarkodie, Diamond Platnumz, Toofan, Mafikizolo,and others have either won or have been nominated for this “Best International Act” award. Winners, such as Davido (2014) were handed their award at a pre-event taping way before the main ceremony took place.

BET also doesn’t allow these artists to perform during the main ceremony or provide them with a platform to introduce their music and culture to the American public. Contrastingly, there are moments in the main ceremony where new or unknown American artists are granted the opportunity to perform and introduce themselves. These small segments take place throughout the show, either in between performances or leading into commercials. Why cant these African artists be granted the same spotlight? If they are recognized enough to receive an award, then they should also be given the opportunity to share their work like the American artists. Furthermore, these new American artists are on the “come-up” in the U.S, whereas the nominated African artists are already established and have fans all over the world.

It is sad that Africans are receiving this kind of treatment from African Americans. Ironically, when African American artists come to perform in Africa they are well received and treated as kings and queens. This same treatment should be reciprocated to the African artists when they come to perform or attend an event in the U.S. Some of the blame should be put on the African artists themselves because they allow themselves to be treated like this. These artists take pictures at the BET events and post them on Facebook and other social media networks as if their presence was valuable. The posting of these pictures is just a way of deceiving themselves into believing their attendance held some importance, when in reality they are unnoticed by the American public. I am trying to understand why an artist would continue to attend an event in which they are seen as insignificant. I wonder if it has anything to do with the “African inferiority complex”. This complex leads Africans to believe that because something is from or provided by the U.S/Western world that it is superior. Again the irony in the situation is that the superior value these Africans provide Americans/Westerners with is not reciprocated. The BET “Best International Act” award has no significance in the African artists music careers nor does it provide them with a true platform to share their music in the US. It angers me that these artists continue to come back as if the BET approval is needed in order to legitimize their success.

I do not believe that African artists need to seek recognition or fame within a demographic that doesn’t understand, or is ignorant to their music and culture. These artists’ main focus should be on remaining true to their art and composing great music that can stand the test of time. There have been a plethora of accomplished African pioneers in the music industry that have been internationally successful without BET (or the equivalent of BET in their era). Some of these artists include: Fela Kuti, Youssou N’dour, Manu Dibango, Miriam Makeba, Hugh Masakella, Salif Keita, Angelique Kidjo, Oliver Nthukunzi, Cesaria Evora, Alpha, Blondy, Lucky Dube, Brenda Fassie, King Sunny Ade, Sonny Okosun, Madjeck Fashek, 2Face, Franco, Tabu Ley, Mbila Bel, Papa Wemba, Koffi Olomide, Omar Pene, Baba Maal, Oumou Sangare, Mohamed Mahmoud, Aster Aweke, Teddy Afro, Eboa Lottin, Sam Fan Thomas, Richard Bona, Henry Dikongue, Petit Pays, Meiway, Gadji Celi, Ofori Amponsah, Kojo Antwi, Nana Acheampong, Daddy Lumba, and many more.

Fela Kuti is one of the most accomplished African artists of all time. He was a Nigerian multi-instrumentalist, musician, composer, and pioneer of the Afrobeat music genre. Fela is the only African artist, and one of the few artists in the world, for which a Broadway musical was created to pay homage to his influence on pop culture. His Broadway show went on a worldwide tour and was sold out in every single city. Fela sang exclusively in pidgin or broken English. Although Fela traveled around the world, his permanent address was his shrine in Lagos, Nigeria. Fela did not seek approval or recognition from an organization to legitimize his work. Another example of an accomplished African artist is Youssou N’dour. Youssou N’dour is a Senegalese singer, percussionist, songwriter, businessman, and politician. He is one Africa’s most successful and arguably richest artists. He still lives in his homeland and sings in his mother tongue, Wolof, as well as English and French. N’dour helped develop a style of popular Senegalese music known as Mbalax. He is also the subject of award-winning films which were released around the world. Youssou N’dour is one of the few African artists that has sold out international shows year after year. Fela and N’dour never had to assimilate to the Western world or seek approval in order to be loved worldwide. These two artists are perfect examples of achieving success on a grand scale through hard work, remaining true to themselves, and remaining true to their art. Once again Fela and N’dour did not seek help from the likes of BET in order to become accomplished on and off the African continent.

I am curious and also angered by whoever is managing these African artists that come to the BET awards. How could one allow their artist to be treated as second class or not fit for American prime-time television? These artists need someone right here in the U.S that understands the music business in order to guide and protect these artists, as well as preserve the African pride. I believe that African artists should boycott the BET awards until they are treated with the respect they deserve.”

Dj Chick (Twitter Handle @DJChicandFrendz )

www.djchickandfriends.com

*****************************************************************************
Love, Peace and Beautiful Afro Music,

Tosinger

The Role of the Creative Arts to #BringBackOurGirls

It is a proven fact that the creative arts can be weapons of social and political change. The Arts have and do still play a role in the struggle for justice. History confirms that some works of art, music, poetry, film are linked to waves of  social, economic and political change all over the world e.g  Playwright and Writer Pushkin’s work as it affected Russian politics in the 1800s, or Fela Kuti’s Afrobeat music as a tool to address the corrupt government, numerous ‘Free Mandela’ songs in the fight for apartheid and many more.

Listed below, are creative works, specifically Art, Photography, Music, Fashion and Literature that have in one way or the other attracted public awareness and media attention to the unsettling issue of the abducted Chibok girls in Northern Nigeria. The social media outcry which got the attention of international media eventually moved the complacent government to seek the help needed. As at today, the kidnapped girls by extremist Islamic group Boko Haram, are still being held with reports of 2 already dead, and 20 sick. Boko Haram also released a video saying they intend to sell the girls.

In today’s age, new media is playing a great role as a great platform to exercise the voice of the people through social media, as seen in the case of Libya and Egypt also. On Twitter, the hashtag #BringBackOurGirls led to rally formations and protests across different cities globally

Photography

At the Atlanta rally, where I was present, Atlanta based Photographer Terrell Clark had an artistic vision to capture all the ladies who came out to #RockACrownfor234 and highlighted their headwraps against a dark and moody backdrop of their faces.

Terrell says:

In the spirit of “darkness” surrounding our sisters, I intentionally underexposed the photographs under the banner of “until our girls are found and brought home, we are all living in the shadows”

View gallery here, password ‘girls’

Fashion

Headwraps hold a significant meaning and symbolism to Africans everywhere.It is the African woman’s crown, a fashion statement, an accessory. Head wraps have served as a head cover for Africans,  since the early 1700s.The colorful cloths represent the history of the African people and are worn proudly by both men and women – ehow. It was worn as a representative of a cultural significance and an item of solidarity for the missing girls.

Click photo below for gallery from Finding Paola:

Music

KennyK’ore , a popular Nigerian Gospel Singer released a song ‘Bring Down Boko Haram’

Annoyed and livid at the gruesome killings and bombings happening in Nigeria, popular gospel artiste Kenny Kore has decided to cry and plead to God in this new single ‘Bring Down Boko Haram’ for Nigeria’s deliverance and salvation. “I love the northerners, but I hate Boko Haram. Bring down Boko Haram, cut down Boko Haram, shut down Boko Haram”…K’ore sings. He features vocals from the Late Benson Idahosa – PraiseWorld

Download/Listen here 

Art

 Numerous graphics are everywhere on social media with the trending hashtag #BringBackOurGirls . Visuals are the running engine of social media, and these are just a few that caught my eye.

Embedded image permalink
with the names of the girls embedded by MADC
Art by Abinibi
Art by E5Studioz
Unknown
Art by Laolu Senbanjo of Afromysterics

Literature

A short story by Patrick Elay, a Switzerland based Nigerian Writer/Scriptwriter

“If you open your mouth, I’ll kill you!” His eyes shone red in the night and his hands held firm to the axe as he drew her hair with her lips quivering beneath her hands. They all sat lost in the reality of the moment. The cries had gradually turned into sobs, fading into gasps and finally had become silence. … continue to read here

So what can you do?

Let’s continue to use the hashtag #BringBackOurGirls. Every little bit goes a long way.  Call or write your government – Change.org petition Let us come together and tell the world that we do not condone violence and  we want our girls rescued, the Nigerian government should work hand in hand with international governments and organizations to rescue the girls, because at this point it is obvious help is needed. Pray for the girls and the families, this is also a spiritual battle. Join www.facebook.com/bringbackourgirls for news and updates. Prayers, Protests, Petitions and Platforms of expressions …all go a long way in effecting the change we want to see.

Malala lends her voice

 

Beautifully Dreaming, Positively Doing…

xoxo

Tosinger

Disheartening News From The Home Country – A Trio of Songs

There it goes again… the news that makes your heart sink…. that makes worry creep on you like tangled snakes trying to eat the flesh of one’s heart away..

 Abuja ( Capital City of Nigeria) – 88 killed, over 200 injured in Abuja bombing – “A total of 88 people were killed today when a car laden with improvised explosive devices (IEDS) went off at the Nyanya Motor Park”VanguardNG …………………and then followed by More than 200 people are feared dead in an explosion which rocked an outskirts of Abuja, the Nigerian capital, this morning” PremiumTimesNG.

So disheartening and unthinkable what humans can do to one another, the wickedness, the inhumanity… Gory pictures fill our screens, we cannot take it any longer… As Aton Ulzen Appiah (of Ghana Think Foundation)  wrote on his G+ ” Sad news of this Abuja bombing that’s thought to have left about 200 dead. The root of the Boko Haram problem must be solved immediately.” Someone replied on his post I doubt something like that can happen in ____ . In _____ , we fight with our mouth not our hands and weapons” 

But

I am because we are. We are human only through the humanity of other human beings. "A person with Ubuntu is open and available to others, affirming of others, does not feel threatened that others are able and good, for he or she has a proper self-assurance that comes from knowing that he or she belongs in a greater whole and is diminished when others are humiliated or diminished, when others are tortured or oppressed." - Desmond Tutu

The day we start to think of ourselves as part of a same body, Christians and Muslims, Nigerians and other African countries one to the other, as brothers and sisters – (Africa Oh Africa, we should unite to help one another, sympathy and empathy ), the day we understand that killing others means we are actually killing ourselves, then that day the world will be at peace. As it is, this spiritual truth is yet to be comprehended. Praying for comfort for the affected families.

Comfort For The Tears

Africa Unite

 

We have to BE FREE, we are all together in the same boat of humanity.

Photo: #StopTheKilling up on the  #Blog #songdedication. God comfort the families of the departed http://tosingersblog.com/2014/04/14/disheartening-news-from-the-home-country-a-trio-of-songs/

Beautifully Dreaming… Positively Doing..

xoxo

Tosinger

‘Garden of Eden’

Let’s take a walk through a wonder of nature. Have you ever heard of the  ‘Garden of Eden’?

The world's largest cave contains a jungle..!!     Two hundred meters below the earth in Vietnam lies a jungle contained by the Hang Son Doong cave. Because of a collapsed portion of the cave roof, vegetation began to grow and form what would be the largest cave jungle. The jungle is fairly small, but considering its location also fairly incredible. It also has the nickname ‘Garden of Eden.’

The world’s largest cave contains a jungle..!! Two hundred meters below the earth in Vietnam lies a jungle contained by the Hang Son Doong cave. Because of a collapsed portion of the cave roof, vegetation began to grow and form what would be the largest cave jungle. The jungle is fairly small, but considering its location also fairly incredible. It also has the nickname ‘Garden of Eden.’

Isn’t God the greatest Artist?

Click here to book a trip to anywhere in the world

Click here if you want to make extra income as  a travel agent

Beautifully Dreaming.. Positively Doing..

xoxo

Tosinger

You’ve got to see this:::Flash Mob – Naija Style At The Lagos MMA2 Airport

Proudly African, Proudly Nigerian!

Have you heard the saying “Naija no dey carry last” as in …while there is no perfect country, Nigeria has its own great highlights and talents doing the country proud and they would not ‘be last’ doing it.  Let’s enjoy this choreography/dance flash mob (which is getting quite customary in pop culture these days) This will be the first flashmob at an airport terminal in Nigeria.  It consists of a mix of professional dancers, cleaning company staff and the Bi-Courtney Aviation Services employees. The CEO, CEO’s wife and COO of the airport also participate at the end.Great way to close the year and keep the traveling public happy. Try to ignore the background comments of the mobile videographer (which is comic relief in itself) 😀

Enjoy!

If you’ve never been to Nigeria, here is a view of the kind of food/snacks you’ll see on a road trip.

(These pics are courtesy of Dapo Taiwo from his recent trip from Lagos-Abuja, thanks for sharing)

IMG-20131206-WA0010
Suya – Meat and oh so spicy pepper
IMG-20131207-WA0002
More Suya
IMG-20131207-WA0003
Grilled Plantains and Fried Yams (Dodo at Dundun)

Are your taste buds activated? If you are based internationally, Do Visit Nigeria sometime.. All the entertainment celebrities have already seen the light, Mariah Carey, Wyclef Jean and J Moss just left 🙂

Beautifully Dreaming, Positively Doing…

xoxo

Tosinger

Earth Shift – Egypt’s First Snow in 100+ Years & Some Music

Brrrrrrrrrrr…

It’s a rainy day in Georgia BUT it’s been snowy for the first time in a long time in the African country of ‘Egypt’. The snow that has blanketed much of the Middle East turned Cairo white on Friday – with local news reports claiming it was Egypt’s capital’s first snowfall in 112 years.  Western Wall and the Dome of the Rock, some of the holiest sites for for Jews and Muslims were covered in snow yesterday. Early snow has surprised many Israelis and Palestinians as a blustery storm, dubbed Alexa, brought gusty winds, torrential rains and heavy snowfall to parts of the Middle East. (AP (The Associated Press) .

As you and I know, the main reason why large portions of the continent are hot (tropical or desert) is because large sections fall across the equator, as well as two very large sections that fall within the tropics of Capricorn and Cancer. This means (in general) the continent has a very high exposure to sunlight, more so than countries in the northern hemisphere (e.g. Europe) so it’s either hot or dry or wet with rainfall in Africa in general. So this is some shocking NEWS that a part of Africa can not only dream of but see a white Christmas after all… let’s see what explanations environmentalists and scientists will have for this, I daresay, it could be a spiritual earth shift, maybe?.ha!

snow egypt

78d920d2e479cb29450f6a70670003bd.jpg

Click for more photos and Enjoy some music..

Beautifully Dream, Positively Do..

xoxo

Tosinger

Beyoncé (& Chimamanda?!) – A Flawless Release

Happy Friday…

So Beyoncé shocked the world with a surprise ‘overnight’ iTunes release of a new 14-track self-titled ‘visual’ album (as she calls it) while breaking a few known traditions of the music industry 1. released without promotion 2.  you cannot get the singles, you have to get the whole album 3. complete with a video for every song (plus three additional visuals) i.e there are videos already recorded for each of the songs on the album with  0.30 previews on YouTube. 4. The album graphic has no creative element.  5. Physical CDs not available yet…etc. . Who else can pull that of?

One of the tracks of interest ‘Flawless’ includes a surprise guest, a narrative feature from the Nigerian globally acclaimed author/writer “Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie” known for her strong and well delievered views. Plus, as observed, mainstream American pop (or not) artists are favoring a lot of African partnerships in recent times, Bey just did a very unique thing with a literal talent rather than a  musical one. Hopefully, this intellectual property use is generously compensated ;). Other features are Jay Z, Justin Timberlake, Frank Ocean, Drake, Pharrell Williams, Timbaland, Michelle Williams, Kelly Rowland and Blue Ivy herself on “Blue.” This feature is not a review of the album so I guess if you are a Beyoncé fan, you can get it here

11. ***Flawless (feat. Chimamanda Ngozi Adiche)

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie‘s TEDxEuston talk, ‘We Should All Be Feminists’ is featured on a song on Beyonce’s new album.

It will be nice to hear a public statement from Chimamanda on how she got involved but until then I guess we will wait. I don’t know what to think of the visual below, artistic maybe?

According to a Fuse report: Explaining why she delivered the full album and accompanying visuals without any prior warning, she noted in her statement: “I didn’t want to release my music the way I’ve done it. I’m bored with that. I feel like I am able to speak directly to my fans. There’s so much that gets between music, the artist and the fans. I felt like I didn’t want anybody to give the message when my record is coming out. I just want this to come out when it’s ready and from me to my fans.” Well, that’s a sign of creative dreamer or a publicity stunt?  What do you think?

Apparently, this was of course, well prepared for in advance, it is what I will call ‘A Planned Surprise’. She will be getting, surely enough, major publicity post release, being a major artist brand. Who says things have to be done according to a norm, it’s time to dream and break the rules, you just might succeed doing that, like Queen B…

Beautifully Dreaming… Positively Doing…

xoxo

Tosinger

More than Art, More than Ink

Howdy,

If you are reading this blog, you sure are a lover of the arts… And I surely feed your mind with every and anything that is related to the creative arts. Today, a headline caught my attention which made me beg the question – When does a tattoo transcend beyond art and become a factor of judgmental stereotyping? –> Well, when you see a headline like this ‘HIP HOP ARTIST WITH TATTOOS ON HIS FACE KICKED OFF FLIGHT BY ALASKAN AIRLINES’, you sure want to read the full story but here’s a little paraphrased insight into the origin of tattoos culled from CoolQuiz

Tattoos

Whether they are on arms, legs, ankles or buttocks, tattoos are body decorations on bodies and a popular fad among many people.The word, tattoo originates from the Tahitian word tattau, which means “to mark” and was first mentioned in explorer James Cook’s records from his 1769 expedition to the South Pacific. However, some scientists believe that the earliest known evidence of tattooing dates back to markings found on the skin of the Iceman, a mummified human body that dates as far back as 3300 B.C.

Tattooing was rediscovered by Europeans when they came into contact with Polynesians and American Indians through their explorations. Because tattoos were considered so exotic in European and U.S. societies, tattooed Indians and Polynesians amazed crowds at circuses and fairs during the 18th and 19th centuries.

The practice of tattooing has different meanings to various cultures. Decoration was the most common motive for tattooing and that still holds true today. In some cultures, tattoos served as identification of the wearer’s rank or status within a group. For instance, the early Romans tattooed slaves and criminals. Tahitian tattoos served as rites of passage, telling the history of the wearer’s life.

Back to the original story which caught my attention:

mikeflo - pic from his FB page
mikeflo (fb pic)

On July 14, 2013,  Hip Hop artist and DJ – Michael Flowers aka ‘mikeflo’ was traveling from Seattle, Washington to Portland, Oregon on Alaska Airlines for a performance when he was removed from his flight because the flight attendant was uncomfortable with the tattoos on his face.  Mr. Flowers, co-founder of the socially conscious hip hop duo Dead Prez, booked his flight with Alaska Airlines, a Delta Air Lines Inc. partner, and travels internationally performing with Dead Prez as an independent artist and DJ.After boarding the plane, securing his carry on, and saying hello to an unaccompanied child seated next to him, the flight attendant came over to the child and said, “I don’t trust the guy with the tattoos so I am going to move your seat.”
Not long after, the flight attendant moved the minor child and placed an adult next to Mr. Flowers. Within minutes, Mr. Flowers was then told by another employee of Alaska Airlines to gather his belongings and exit the aircraft. The only explanation given for his removal from the flight was that the flight attendant did not feel comfortable that he would comply with FAA rules.
Mr. Flowers was not allowed back on the flight and consequently missed the sound check for the performance.
“I was stunned and humiliated. I am a platinum medallion member with Delta and I fly thousands of miles a year. I feel like they violated my freedom of expression. “ – Mike Flowers aka mikeflo
“Mr. Flowers has religious and cultural tattoos on his face as an expression of his spiritual beliefs. We are investigating the incident and considering all legal options.” – says Attorney Mawuli Mel Davis, Davis Bozeman Law Firm. 
The case is being currently visited and mikeflo is using social media to bring attention to it. Twitter hashtag is  #itsartnotacrime.  Voice your thoughts in the comment section below and/or also leave your thoughts at https://www.alaskaair.com/feedback

Are tattoos negatively stereotyped in the United States? Here are thoughts and the overwhelming answer to this debate at this link .

It should be an ‘Ubuntu’ world after all…

Beautifully Dreaming, Positively Doing…

xoxo

Tosinger