Tag Archives: artist

TOSINGER: The ‘Organically Singing’ AfroSoul and AfroFolk Queen of Dreams — afrocipha

My music is inspirational. Genre wise, my style is African, roots, ethnic, folksy and soulful with a contemporary edge. I incorporate my native Yoruba language in my songs. I am from Ogun State Nigeria, West Africa, currently based in Atlanta, Georgia, USA. … Tosinger Oluwatosin [in her native Yoruba language Tosin means God is worthy to […]

via TOSINGER: The ‘Organically Singing’ AfroSoul and AfroFolk Queen of Dreams — afrocipha

Lagbaja US Tour – Live in Atlanta with Special Guest Tosinger

Nigeria’s international musician, Bisade Ologunde popularly known as Lagbaja embarked on a month-long tour of the United States of America. The tour will see Lagbaja and his 8 piece Motherland band perform at 15 different cities. It ends on May 17, 2015 at Washington DC.

I will be opening for him in Atlanta on May 10 at the popular concert space – The Variety Playhouse. Click here for more info

Atlanta based, eclectic afrosoulful artist, Tosinger. opens for legendary afrobeat/afrojazz artist from Nigeria – Lagbaja on May 10 at 7pm at the Variety Playhouse, Atlanta

Windstorm Productions Proudly Presents

 LAGBAJA

LAgbaja_72

The first question that is often asked when Lágbájá is encountered is, “Why the mask?” Basically, Lágbájá’s mask is used as an icon of man’s facelessness.

Lágbájá is a Yoruba word that means somebody, nobody, anybody or everybody. It perfectly depicts the anonymity of the so called “common man”. The mask and the name symbolize the faceless, the voiceless in the society, particularly in Africa. Once you see Lágbájá’s mask you are reminded of your own facelessness. This symbolism is so powerful that Lágbájá’s mask has popularized the use of the mask concept by other artistes both in Nigeria and beyond.

Though the concept was developed long before that, his first album (entitled Lágbájá) was released to National acclaim in 1993. Over the years and more albums later, the music continues to fascinate with its unique focus on a core of African drums. His music is a product of various influences ranging from traditional Yoruba music to Jazz. Often the music is purely instrumental- an interplay between traditional Yoruba percussions, drums, chants, and western instruments, especially the saxophone. When there are lyrics, they are primarily sung in Yoruba, English or a blend of the two as is colloquially spoken in Yoruba cities. Many of his songs dwell on serious social issues, while others simply entertain. Some are dance inducing while others pass serious messages in humourous ways.

One thing that links all the songs together is his use of traditional African drums. Traditional Yoruba drums are the most prominent. Four families of these drums are employed in creating different grooves and moods. The dundun/gangan family is the most prominent and at times up to five drummers combine all the various components to create the polyrhythms. The bata ensemble is led by two musicians who alternate between soft high toned driving rhythms with their omele bata, and thunderous loud talk with their mum drum- iya ilu. The general percussionist leads the sakara ensemble. The fourth family, used as the backbone of the groove is the ogido, a derivative of the ancient gbedu. The ensemble of drummers constitute the larger part of the band. Vocalists and western instrumentalists make up the rest. Lágbájá’s groovy fusion has been refered to as afrojazz, afrobeat, higherlife and afropop until now that he himself has christened the music AFRICANO, alluding mostly to the central role of African drums and grooves in his music.

Experience Lágbájá! (video)

Sunday, MAy 10, 8pm, $25 advance / $30 day of show

Tickets available at the Variety Playhouse Box Office and all Ticketmaster Outlets.
Order by phone at 800-745-3000 or online here.

Beautifully Dreaming, Positively Doing…
Tosinger

Artist Spotlight: @KomiOlaf – ‘Art is Life’

Ontario, Canada based multi-talented artist of Nigerian heritage,  Komi Olafimihan’s  unique conceptual work is beyond the ordinary. His work speaks of very detailed stories as he incorporates his architectural knowledge, artistic flair and mental depth  to create masterpieces that are an expression of his ingenious mind, the astute creative that he is.

He says “Art is Life”…

https://i0.wp.com/photos-g.ak.instagram.com/hphotos-ak-xpf1/10724783_718466108237518_1322980445_n.jpg

About Komi Olaf – Artist – Poet – Architect

Komi Olaf is a visual artist and poet currently living in Toronto. As a master’s graduate of Carleton University’s School of Architecture, his training as an architect directly influences his draftsmanship and manipulation of light and space. His work is based primarily in acrylic and explores the dialogue created through the juxtaposition of images concepts and identities.

His works have been featured in shows at the Royal Ontario Museum in Toronto and the National Arts Center in Ottawa. He has also received several awards pertaining to his works including the Empowerment and Success Award presented by the then Governor General of Canada Michaelle Jean in 2010 and the Student Award for excellence presented by the Canadian Architect Magazine in 2009.

Komi is a strong believer in the synonyms that exists between images, philosophies and concepts.

Artist Statement

My work is an extension of who I am. A direct representation of my character and experiences. While I was completing a Masters in Architecture, I developed a passion for both painting and poetry and I have been on a mission to fuse these three elements ever since.

Drawing from the various skills and techniques I have been acquiring over the years, I strive to create unique, inspirational and original work that captures the history of African people and the mind-set of the younger generation. As a Canadian immigrant and a Nigerian in Diaspora, I tend to focus my art on the juxtaposition of unrelated images to produce new meaning. My personal experiences such as the religious conflicts plaguing Nigeria have also had an impact on the work I create.

Ultimately, I would love my work to offer insight into the thoughts of the new generation of artists emerging out of the Diaspora. I want to tell a different story with my work, one that captures the complexities of my African and Canadian heritage as well as sparks the conversations that can inspire change and build a bridge of unity.

Some of his works that caught my eye 

From the Afro Collection

Afromobile – Komi Olaf
‘Speak it into existence’ – Komi Olaf
Touch Music Emcee E Art by Komi Olaf
Cross Section Of the AFROpuf – Komi Olaf
komiolaf-floating dreamer
Self Portrait – Komi Olaf

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The Queens
From the “Angels of Music” Collection – The Queens by Komi Olaf

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dayo

And I remember this one of ‘Kermit the Frog’ going viral on instagram, turned into several memes by internet users, such a great discovery to know  who the original artist is.

Igwe
Sesame Street collection. Igwe by Komi Olaf

Komi Olaf. Spoken Word – Love

For more info and to stay updated on Komi Olaf’s projects –

More than Art, More than Ink

Howdy,

If you are reading this blog, you sure are a lover of the arts… And I surely feed your mind with every and anything that is related to the creative arts. Today, a headline caught my attention which made me beg the question – When does a tattoo transcend beyond art and become a factor of judgmental stereotyping? –> Well, when you see a headline like this ‘HIP HOP ARTIST WITH TATTOOS ON HIS FACE KICKED OFF FLIGHT BY ALASKAN AIRLINES’, you sure want to read the full story but here’s a little paraphrased insight into the origin of tattoos culled from CoolQuiz

Tattoos

Whether they are on arms, legs, ankles or buttocks, tattoos are body decorations on bodies and a popular fad among many people.The word, tattoo originates from the Tahitian word tattau, which means “to mark” and was first mentioned in explorer James Cook’s records from his 1769 expedition to the South Pacific. However, some scientists believe that the earliest known evidence of tattooing dates back to markings found on the skin of the Iceman, a mummified human body that dates as far back as 3300 B.C.

Tattooing was rediscovered by Europeans when they came into contact with Polynesians and American Indians through their explorations. Because tattoos were considered so exotic in European and U.S. societies, tattooed Indians and Polynesians amazed crowds at circuses and fairs during the 18th and 19th centuries.

The practice of tattooing has different meanings to various cultures. Decoration was the most common motive for tattooing and that still holds true today. In some cultures, tattoos served as identification of the wearer’s rank or status within a group. For instance, the early Romans tattooed slaves and criminals. Tahitian tattoos served as rites of passage, telling the history of the wearer’s life.

Back to the original story which caught my attention:

mikeflo - pic from his FB page
mikeflo (fb pic)

On July 14, 2013,  Hip Hop artist and DJ – Michael Flowers aka ‘mikeflo’ was traveling from Seattle, Washington to Portland, Oregon on Alaska Airlines for a performance when he was removed from his flight because the flight attendant was uncomfortable with the tattoos on his face.  Mr. Flowers, co-founder of the socially conscious hip hop duo Dead Prez, booked his flight with Alaska Airlines, a Delta Air Lines Inc. partner, and travels internationally performing with Dead Prez as an independent artist and DJ.After boarding the plane, securing his carry on, and saying hello to an unaccompanied child seated next to him, the flight attendant came over to the child and said, “I don’t trust the guy with the tattoos so I am going to move your seat.”
Not long after, the flight attendant moved the minor child and placed an adult next to Mr. Flowers. Within minutes, Mr. Flowers was then told by another employee of Alaska Airlines to gather his belongings and exit the aircraft. The only explanation given for his removal from the flight was that the flight attendant did not feel comfortable that he would comply with FAA rules.
Mr. Flowers was not allowed back on the flight and consequently missed the sound check for the performance.
“I was stunned and humiliated. I am a platinum medallion member with Delta and I fly thousands of miles a year. I feel like they violated my freedom of expression. “ – Mike Flowers aka mikeflo
“Mr. Flowers has religious and cultural tattoos on his face as an expression of his spiritual beliefs. We are investigating the incident and considering all legal options.” – says Attorney Mawuli Mel Davis, Davis Bozeman Law Firm. 
The case is being currently visited and mikeflo is using social media to bring attention to it. Twitter hashtag is  #itsartnotacrime.  Voice your thoughts in the comment section below and/or also leave your thoughts at https://www.alaskaair.com/feedback

Are tattoos negatively stereotyped in the United States? Here are thoughts and the overwhelming answer to this debate at this link .

It should be an ‘Ubuntu’ world after all…

Beautifully Dreaming, Positively Doing…

xoxo

Tosinger