Tag Archives: fela

Carrying on the legacy of Afro Music – #Felabration with @Afromysterics NYC

In honor of Fela Kuti, his music legacy and in commemoration of his birthday, Felabration! an annual celebration is taking place in various cities all around the world during the month of October. (October 15, 2014 would be Fela Kuti’s 76th birthday). 

“The idea and concept of Felabration as an annual celebration of Fela’s music, life and times, originated from his eldest child Yeni who conceived it in 1998”. …Read more here

The impact of Fela’s Afrobeat music cannot be overemphasized and his musical legacy surely lives on, greatly influencing the works of the today’s crop of Afro artists.

And so I am honored to be a part of Harlem-New York’s Felabration concert as a  special guest of Laolu and The Afromysterics , also featuring the Super Yamba Band, where I’ll be doing some favs and a couple of originals. See you there if you are in NYC!

Click on images for more info:

and

See

I am also featuring at OritseFemi’s concert in NY organized by Vibesland Entertainment.  I have always been drawn to his music, his afro indigenous and passionate sound and style (Mercies of the Lord and Better are some of my favs) and I am glad to open for him. He recently did a spin on Fela’s Double Wahala which is currently a great hit in the Nigerian music industry.

Knitting Factory has a special offer going on that you might want to check out if you are an ardent Afrobeat lover

Culled from Knitting Factory FB page

“Happy Birthday Fela Kuti!!! The Original Black President!

Felabrations are taking place around the world in celebration of his life and legacy.
Knitting Factory Records is offering 15% off the entire Fela Kuti catalog (excluding box sets) for the month of October.
Use code: HAPPYBDAYFELA at checkout)”

 Beautifully Dreaming… Positively Doing and keeping the flag of Afro music flying….

Tosinger

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The Role of the Creative Arts to #BringBackOurGirls

It is a proven fact that the creative arts can be weapons of social and political change. The Arts have and do still play a role in the struggle for justice. History confirms that some works of art, music, poetry, film are linked to waves of  social, economic and political change all over the world e.g  Playwright and Writer Pushkin’s work as it affected Russian politics in the 1800s, or Fela Kuti’s Afrobeat music as a tool to address the corrupt government, numerous ‘Free Mandela’ songs in the fight for apartheid and many more.

Listed below, are creative works, specifically Art, Photography, Music, Fashion and Literature that have in one way or the other attracted public awareness and media attention to the unsettling issue of the abducted Chibok girls in Northern Nigeria. The social media outcry which got the attention of international media eventually moved the complacent government to seek the help needed. As at today, the kidnapped girls by extremist Islamic group Boko Haram, are still being held with reports of 2 already dead, and 20 sick. Boko Haram also released a video saying they intend to sell the girls.

In today’s age, new media is playing a great role as a great platform to exercise the voice of the people through social media, as seen in the case of Libya and Egypt also. On Twitter, the hashtag #BringBackOurGirls led to rally formations and protests across different cities globally

Photography

At the Atlanta rally, where I was present, Atlanta based Photographer Terrell Clark had an artistic vision to capture all the ladies who came out to #RockACrownfor234 and highlighted their headwraps against a dark and moody backdrop of their faces.

Terrell says:

In the spirit of “darkness” surrounding our sisters, I intentionally underexposed the photographs under the banner of “until our girls are found and brought home, we are all living in the shadows”

View gallery here, password ‘girls’

Fashion

Headwraps hold a significant meaning and symbolism to Africans everywhere.It is the African woman’s crown, a fashion statement, an accessory. Head wraps have served as a head cover for Africans,  since the early 1700s.The colorful cloths represent the history of the African people and are worn proudly by both men and women – ehow. It was worn as a representative of a cultural significance and an item of solidarity for the missing girls.

Click photo below for gallery from Finding Paola:

Music

KennyK’ore , a popular Nigerian Gospel Singer released a song ‘Bring Down Boko Haram’

Annoyed and livid at the gruesome killings and bombings happening in Nigeria, popular gospel artiste Kenny Kore has decided to cry and plead to God in this new single ‘Bring Down Boko Haram’ for Nigeria’s deliverance and salvation. “I love the northerners, but I hate Boko Haram. Bring down Boko Haram, cut down Boko Haram, shut down Boko Haram”…K’ore sings. He features vocals from the Late Benson Idahosa – PraiseWorld

Download/Listen here 

Art

 Numerous graphics are everywhere on social media with the trending hashtag #BringBackOurGirls . Visuals are the running engine of social media, and these are just a few that caught my eye.

Embedded image permalink
with the names of the girls embedded by MADC
Art by Abinibi
Art by E5Studioz
Unknown
Art by Laolu Senbanjo of Afromysterics

Literature

A short story by Patrick Elay, a Switzerland based Nigerian Writer/Scriptwriter

“If you open your mouth, I’ll kill you!” His eyes shone red in the night and his hands held firm to the axe as he drew her hair with her lips quivering beneath her hands. They all sat lost in the reality of the moment. The cries had gradually turned into sobs, fading into gasps and finally had become silence. … continue to read here

So what can you do?

Let’s continue to use the hashtag #BringBackOurGirls. Every little bit goes a long way.  Call or write your government – Change.org petition Let us come together and tell the world that we do not condone violence and  we want our girls rescued, the Nigerian government should work hand in hand with international governments and organizations to rescue the girls, because at this point it is obvious help is needed. Pray for the girls and the families, this is also a spiritual battle. Join www.facebook.com/bringbackourgirls for news and updates. Prayers, Protests, Petitions and Platforms of expressions …all go a long way in effecting the change we want to see.

Malala lends her voice

 

Beautifully Dreaming, Positively Doing…

xoxo

Tosinger

CAPTAIN ‘KEZIAH JONES’ THE RUGGED – Audio & Visuals

Hiya,

Have you heard of the  Guitar Wiz Musician Keziah Jones? What?! You haven’t?  Well, now you do, no dozing on a musical bicycle 🙂 The continents are loving his “Afro BluFunk” music, Europe in particular. An eccentric Afro ~ Bohemian, he is very relevant to the new wave of the Afro musical scene even though he has been around for a while. I personally love his branding, the uniqueness and incorporation of Afro elements ( especially on his latest project which depicts him as having superpowers dressed in a simple yet dramatic costume made out of African Ankara fabric) Here are a few picks from his photoshoot,  so distinctly intriguing, a representation of a musical African SuperHero.. His new album ‘Captain Rugged’ is available on iTunes.

Biography

A Nigerian-born rocker heavily influenced by Jimi Hendrix and Fela Kuti, Keziah Jones gained popularity in England and France with singles like “Rhythm Is Love” and “Beautiful Emile.” Jones was sent to a boarding school in London when he was eight, and he started busking in the London Underground when he was in his teens. He gigged up a storm in Covent Garden and Portobello Road, which led to his discovery by manager Phil Pickett. One bassist (Phil “Soul” Sewell), one drummer (Richie Stevens), and many gigs later, Jones found himself with his first album, Blufunk Is a Fact!, in 1992. Several more albums ensued over the next 15 years (African Space Craft, Liquid Sunshine, and Black Orpheus among them), fixing Jones as one of the more prominent blues-rock musicians on the European music scene in the late ’90s and early 2000s.

Less talk, more audio/visual stimulants.

Feed Your Eyes  – Photos by Vincent Thomas (From Keziah Jones’ FB)

Feed Your Ears

Afronewave

The first song of his I ever heard ‘Kpafuka’. Album Version here

And this  one about my hometown : Abeokuta – Egba anthem ‘Oke ati Petele’

For more about Keziah, check out his Wiki or his site here

Beautifully Dreaming, Positively Doing…

xoxo

Tosinger